Magazine-Style Scoop.it Just Might Be the Perfect Curation Tool for Teachers

by on January 15, 2011

Finding educational resources on the web can be a time-consuming job.  Once you find the resource, it must be categorized in some way.  Bookmarking is one solution but lately there has been a surge of curation tools.

I have written about Storify for Educators and Curated.by as possible curation tools for teachers.  I liked the fact that you could embed Storify right into your blog/website.  But not everyone has a blog and the embed feature is not mush use to them.  For those teachers, a direct link to resources is all they really need.  Storify provides that as well but I am a visual guy–the more visually appealing, the better in my opinion.

That’s where Scoop.it comes into play.  I found out about Scoop.it from this Mashable post.  So, of course, I just had to try it!

Scoop.it

Unfortunately, Scoop.it is in private beta so you have to apply for an invite.  My invite came pretty quickly–a day or two at most.  Once I received my invite, I gave it a whirl.

In early February I will be co-presenting with Kelly Kronfeld and Gigi Wheeler about using Google Sites as a collaboration tool for teachers and students.  Part of my job is to assemble a list of Google Sites resources.  Of course, I could find the resources and post them on this blog.  In fact, Storify would work very well.  However, I believe that the information should be as accessible as possible and in as many places as possible.  I know it’s hard to believe but I have been to schools that block my site!!!!

Scoop.it will crawl the web and make suggestions or you can add your own.  I already had a pretty good list that resided in Evernote, Historius, Delicious, Diigo, etc.  Now, I just needed to get them all into one visually appealing location.  Scoop.it also has a bookmarklet to make “scooping” your content easy.

I scooped my content and then found out you can edit each scoop just in case the scoop doesn’t capture the whole essence of the site.  In additon, you can rearrange your scoops easily.  Here’s a screenshot of the result:

I really like the layout of Scoop.it.  It many respects, it reminds me of FlipBoard for the iPad in its visual appeal.

However, the only way you can get the full effect is to go to the site itself–click here.

Great Collaboration Tool!

It turns out that a strength of Scoop.it is its collaborative features.  You can easily share your Scoop.it page on Twitter and Facebook.  Readers can follow your Scoop and also make suggestions.  In addition, it has an RSS feed.  Imagine making any of your scoops available to your students and get their input.

So far, I am really impressed with Scoop.it.  Hopefully, you will be too!

Scoop.it

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